How to Identify And Fix A Gas Leak in a Draft Beer System

29 Oct.,2022

 

air splitter manifold

Many times during a busy season, the gas regulator can get bumped out of place. And before you know it, the gas is leaking out of the faucet. However, gas leaks may also be caused by other issues. If you suspect a gas leak, you can get a spray bottle and fill it with soapy water to perform a leak test.

Begin the spray test at the CO2 tank. Remove the keg from the system, set the regulator to zero pressure, and open the CO2 tank top valve. Start spraying where the regulator nut meets the CO2 tank post. If you notice bubbles, then try to tighten the nut or install a CO2 leak stopper. If you don’t see any bubbles, keep working your way down the system until you see bubbles.

You’ll need to apply low pressure (two to three psi) to the regulator with the hose valve closed, and begin to spray around the regulator gauge threads. Check the threaded connections for pinhole leaks. Then, open the hose valve to allow air down the lines to the keg coupler. Spray all clamp connections on hoses to check for leaks. If you notice any leaks, tightening the clamps will usually fix the issue.

Continue checking for gas leaks by connecting the keg and spraying all connections. If you have multiple kegs, be sure to spray the air splitter manifold and all threaded and clamp connections. If you continue experiencing a gas leak, check the faucet and seals.

Once you’ve concluded the spray test, apply 10 psi to the entire draft system for 15 to 20 minutes. Record the starting tank level from the regulator and then check the level at the end of the time period. If you see a difference in the tank level, then you still have a gas leak and should continue searching for the source of the leak.

Every draft beer system should have CO2 monitors and sensors. This will help save time in identifying the source of the leak and prevent a more serious problem.
For additional tips and tricks, contact Glacier Design Systems.